Skip to main content

Faculty & Staff

John T. Addison

Research Professor

Biography

John T. Addison is Research Professor, and Hugh C. Lane Professor of Economic Theory Emeritus at the University of South Carolina.  He is concurrently a Research Fellow of the Institute of Labor Economics /IZA (Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit) in Bonn, Germany, of the Institute for Employment Research of the Federal German Labor Agency (Institut für Arbeitsmarkt-  und Berufsforschung der Bundesagentur für Arbeit) in Nuremberg Germany, and of the Center for Labor and Employment Law, New York University School of Law. He is the author of several labor texts, including The Market for Labor: An Analytical Treatment (with W. Stanley Siebert); The Economic Analysis of Unions: New Approaches and Evidence (with Barry T. Hirsch); Job Displacement: Consequences and Implications for Policy; and, most recently, The Economics of Codetermination: Lessons from the German Experience. He has edited The International Handbook of Trade Unions (with Claus Schnabel) and Labor Markets and Social Security (with Paul J.J. Welfens). He has published widely in the major economics and specialty labor economics journals, including the Economic Journal, Journal of Business, Review of Economics & Statistics, Industrial & Labor Relations Review, Journal of Labor Economics, Journal of Human Resources, and American Economic Review.

Research Interests

His current research focuses on the impact of the employee representation and collective bargaining on firm performance (Germany), the estimation of high dimensional fixed effect models of wage variation (Portugal), and investigation of minimum wages and employment/the role of gender over a career (the United States). He is currently working on an international monograph on minimum wages for the Institute of Economic Affairs in London.

Education

  • Ph.D., London School of Economics and Political Science, 1971
  • M.S., London School of Economics and Political Science, 1968
  • B.S., London School of Economics and Political Science, 1967